Trump team weighs engaging Arabs allies to push Mideast peace — report

T. Belman. Bibi has long favoured seeking peace through the Arab states i.e., the outside-in approach. Since they want the maximum Israel withdrawal, it is safe to conclude that Bibi is indeed willing to trade land for peace. He is focused on ending the diplomatic war against Israel and is willing to give up a lot of land to achieve it. Too bad.

New administration is considering an ‘outside-in’ approach favored by Netanyahu, according to NY Times

BY ERIC CORTELLESSA, TOI

WASHINGTON — Determined to make the elusive Israeli-Palestinian peace deal, US President Donald Trump is deliberating bringing in Arab states and embracing the “outside-in” approach to peacemaking that has been endorsed by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, according to The New York Times. (See Below)

An article Thursday said that both Trump and his Jewish son-in-law Jared Kushner — who has been designated the point man for the Mideast peace process — have found the idea appealing after meeting with a number of Arab leaders since the president assumed office in January.

In the last three weeks, Trump has meet with Jordan’s King Abdullah II and spoken on the phone with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, the crown prince of Abu Dhabi.

Kushner has reportedly met with a number of Arab officials, including Yousef Al Otaiba, the United Arab Emirates’ ambassador to the United States.

Those discussions, according to The Times, have led the two to believe in the possibility of enlisting such Arab states to help bring Palestinians to the negotiating table and create the conditions for a comprehensive agreement to be made.

Moreover, Kushner has also become friendly with Israel’s envoy to the US Ron Dermer, one of Netanyahu’s closest confidantes, who has sometimes been referred to as “Bibi’s brain.”

Netanyahu, for his part, has said before that Arab cooperation could help make progress on the Palestinian issue. This past summer, he indicated a willingness to work with Arab partners after Egypt’s Sisi promised warmer ties with the Jewish state if it accepted his efforts to resume peace talks.

Netanyahu expressed a desire to resuscitate the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative, proposed by the Saudis, that promised Israel diplomatic recognition from Arab countries in exchange for a deal that results in the establishment of a Palestinian state. That proposal, however, calls for an Israeli withdrawal from the Golan Heights and the return of Palestinians refuges to Israel — points of contention for the Israeli premier.

“This initiative is 13 years old, and the situation in the Middle East has changed since it was first proposed,” he said. “But the general idea — to try and reach understandings with leading Arab countries — is a good idea.”

Since the landmark pact America forged with Iran and world powers in July 2015, which rolled back Tehran’s nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief, Israel has grown closer with many of its Sunni Arab neighbors that also fear the possibility of an empowered Iran — a development the administration may see as an opportunity.

The Times report suggested that Trump’s meeting with Jordan’s King Abdullah two weeks ago was a catalyst to the administration’s mild warning on settlement expansion, a statement that came hours after they spoke at the National Prayer Breakfast.

It also said the president’s conversations with other Arab leaders helped slow the president’s resolve to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Abdullah reportedly told Trump he feared moving the embassy unilaterally would set off unrest among the Palestinians living in Jordan, who make up a large portion of the country’s population.

A strategy aimed at incorporating the Arab world into the Israeli-Palestinian peace process is not necessarily original. Former president George H.W. Bush and his secretary of state James Baker organized the Madrid Peace Conference in 1991. And former president George W. Bush with his secretary of state Condoleezza Rice convened a peace summit in Annapolis, Md. in 2007.

Also on Thursday, it was disclosed that Palestinian intelligence chief Majed Faraj met with security and intelligence officials in Washington this week.

The Palestinian leadership had recently expressed fear it was being shut out of the new administration as Trump appears to be cultivating a close relationship with Netanyahu, who will meet the president for the first time next week at the White House.

NYT article

Trump May Turn to Arab Allies for Help With Israeli-Palestinian Relations

By PETER BAKER and MARK LANDLER, NYT FEB. 9, 2017

An Israeli settlement in the West Bank. President Trump initially presented himself as an unstinting supporter of new settlement construction, but he has tempered that position somewhat. Credit Dan Balilty for The New York Times
WASHINGTON — President Trump and his advisers, venturing for the first time into the fraught world of Middle East peacemaking, are developing a strategy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that would enlist Arab nations like Saudi Arabia and Egypt to break years of deadlock.

The emerging approach mirrors the thinking of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, who will visit the United States next week, and would build on his de facto alignment with Sunni Muslim countries in trying to counter the rise of Shiite-led Iran. But Arab officials have warned Mr. Trump and his advisers that if they want cooperation, the United States cannot make life harder for them with provocative pro-Israel moves.

The White House seems to be taking the advice. Mr. Trump delayed his plan to move the United States Embassy to Jerusalem after Arab leaders told him that doing so would cause angry protests among Palestinians, who also claim the city as the capital of a future state. And after meeting with King Abdullah II of Jordan last week, Mr. Trump authorized a statement that, for the first time, cautioned Israel against building new West Bank settlements beyond existing lines.

“There are some quite interesting ideas circulating on the potential for U.S.-Israeli-Arab discussions on regional security in which Israeli-Palestinian issues would play a significant role,” said Robert Satloff, the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “I don’t know if this is going to ripen by next week, but this stuff is out there.”

The discussions underscore the evolution of the new president’s attitude toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as he delves deeper into the issue. During the campaign and the postelection transition, Mr. Trump presented himself as an unstinting supporter of Israel who would quickly move the embassy and support new settlement construction without reservation. But he has tempered that to a degree.

The notion of recruiting Arab countries to help forge an agreement between Israelis and Palestinians — known as the “outside-in” approach — is not a new one. As secretary of state under President George Bush, James A. Baker III organized the first regional conference in 1991 at which Arab leaders sat down with Israel’s prime minister. President George W. Bush invited Arab leaders to a summit meeting with Israel in Annapolis, Md., in 2007. And President Barack Obama’s first special envoy, George Mitchell, spent months in 2009 trying to enlist Arab partners in a joint effort.

Mr. Trump and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel last year in New York. The Trump administration’s emerging approach to Middle East peace efforts mirrors Mr. Netanyahu’s thinking. Credit Reuters
The difference is that in the last eight years, Israel has grown closer to Sunni Arab nations because of their shared concern about Iranian hegemony in the region, opening the possibility that this newfound, if not always public, affiliation could change the dynamics.

“The logic of outside-in is that because the Palestinians are so weak and divided — and because there’s a new, tacit relationship between the Sunni Arabs and Israel — there’s the hope the Arabs would be prepared to do more,” said Dennis B. Ross, a Middle East peace negotiator under several presidents, including Mr. Obama.

That is a departure from the countervailing assumption that if Israel first made peace with the Palestinians, it would lead to peace with the larger Arab world — the “inside-out” approach. That was at the core of President Bill Clinton’s attempts to bring the two sides together and was Mr. Obama’s fallback position after his efforts to find Arab partners failed.

Mr. Netanyahu, who is due at the White House on Wednesday, has been talking about an outside-in approach for a while. His theory is that the inside-out approach has failed. And so, he argues, if Israel can transform its relationship with Sunni Arab nations, they can ultimately lead the way toward a resolution with the Palestinians.

Jared Kushner, the senior White House adviser whom Mr. Trump has assigned a major role in negotiations, has been intrigued by this logic, according to people who have spoken with him. Mr. Kushner has grown close to Ron Dermer, the Israeli ambassador and a close confidant of Mr. Netanyahu’s.

A series of telephone conversations and personal meetings with Arab and regional leaders in recent weeks have also shaped Mr. Kushner’s thinking and that of the president. Mr. Trump has talked with President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt; King Salman of Saudi Arabia; Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, the crown prince of Abu Dhabi; and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey. Mr. Kushner has also met with Arab officials, including Yousef Al Otaiba, the ambassador from the United Arab Emirates.

Jordan’s King Abdullah II seems to have played a particularly pivotal role. Concerned that an embassy move would anger the many Palestinians living in his country, the king rushed to Washington without an invitation in a gamble that he could see Mr. Trump. He visited first with Vice President Mike Pence, who had him over for breakfast at his official residence last week. The king appealed to the administration’s fixation with the Islamic State, arguing that it should not alienate Arab allies who could help.

Several days later, the king buttonholed Mr. Trump on the sidelines of the National Prayer Breakfast and made a similar case. He advised against a radical shift in American policy and emphasized the risks that Jordan would face if Israel were to become even more assertive about building settlements, according to people who spoke with Mr. Kushner and Stephen K. Bannon, the chief White House strategist.

Mr. Trump had already decided by that point to slow down the embassy move — a decision that did not especially trouble Mr. Netanyahu and his team, who, while publicly supporting a move, privately urged caution to avoid a violent backlash. The administration had also received reports from American diplomats in Jordan that the threat level for a terrorist attack there had been raised to the highest level in years.

But a series of announcements of new settlement construction worried some White House officials, who thought Mr. Netanyahu was taking action without first meeting with Mr. Trump.

Within hours of Mr. Trump’s meeting with King Abdullah, the administration leaked a statement to The Jerusalem Post saying, “We urge all parties from taking unilateral actions that could undermine our ability to make progress, including settlement announcements.”

After that was posted online, the White House issued a public statement with softened language: “While we don’t believe the existence of settlements is an impediment to peace, the construction of new settlements or the expansion of existing settlements beyond their current borders may not be helpful in achieving that goal.”

King Abdullah II of Jordan, far left; Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson; and the White House adviser Jared Kushner, right, at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington last week. Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
The statement was worded in a way that let different parties focus on different parts. The “may not be helpful” phrase was the first time Mr. Trump had warned against new housing in the West Bank.

But the “beyond their current borders” phrase suggested a return to George W. Bush’s policy of essentially acquiescing to additional construction within existing settlement blocs as long as Israel did not expand their geographical reach or build entirely new settlements. Elliott Abrams, one of the authors of that policy under Mr. Bush, is poised to become deputy secretary of state under Mr. Trump.

Mr. Netanyahu’s team focused on that part of the statement. “I happen to know they were very pleased with the statement because it was such a contrast from Obama,” said Morton A. Klein, the national president of the Zionist Organization of America, who has been supportive of the Trump administration.

Indeed, undeterred, Mr. Netanyahu’s coalition pushed through Parliament a bill to retroactively authorize thousands of homes in the West Bank that even under Israeli law had been built illegally on Palestinian-owned land.

Mr. Klein, who argues that settlements are not an obstacle to peace, said the White House had made the statement too confusing to provide clear direction. “I did find it ambiguous, and not as clear as I would like it to be,” he said.

The challenge now is whether Mr. Trump can use this ambiguity to his benefit. If the United States can extract gestures from the Arabs, most likely based on steps outlined in an Arab peace initiative first proposed in 2002, that could provide a basis for Israelis and Palestinians to make compromises that they could not do by themselves, Mr. Ross said.

“You’d have to have some kind of parallel approach,” he said. “This would be a serious investment of diplomacy to probe what is possible.”

February 10, 2017 | 9 Comments » | 64 views

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  1. Of course the arabs would not like the US embassy moved to Jerusalem and riots would ensue. That, however, is not the reason to keep the Embassy in Tel Aviv. The embassy, like a flag, is a symbol. American hesitation about the Embassy is also rather symbolic. In the end there is always violence because as it appears the barbarians get their way. The Palestinian-Israeli conflict much more than territory and much more than a phony state for a phony nation. It is the projection of the real issue; the world’s ambivalence over a sovereign Jewish. The conflict is one in which two worldviews are in opposition; Islam and Judaism. Trump’s ambivalence is not about disturbing the Arabs it is about the Jews.

  2. T. Belman. Bibi has long favoured seeking peace through the Arab states i.e., the outside-in approach. Since they want the maximum Israel withdrawal, it is safe to conclude that Bibi is indeed willing to trade land for peace.

    I don’t understand why any of this is a surprise to you in the same way I don’t understand why anyone here thought that BB sought any more land in YS than the existing major blocks and security arrangements in the Jordan valley, either through military posts or other. His own “peace plans” have overtly stated such and every action he has taken throughout his term has likewise affirmed that. Those actions being his restriction of Jewish settlement to the blocs, his facilitation of illegal euro bldg in C,the transfer of large tracts of land in C for Pal development,never affirming even verbally the Jewish settlement rights to live in YS, defaming settlers at Duma,etc, etc, etc. The notion of BB annexing C is absurd, that desire only exists to the right of BB.

    You appear to have ignored those facts which I have been stating here for years but also my speculations as to the reasons behind his MO, which I have been saying since before it began to be published and acknowledged by BB and the GCC sunni Arab block. Once more it is all stated clearly in this article as it is once again affirmed to be the reason behind Trump moving away from his original position AT BIBI’S BEHEST. Yes, it is clear that BB has got Trump to back off by informing Trump of his “understandings” with the Sunni Arab bloc. Read the article more carefully to see that everything I said is right there. Before BB’s and Trump people were talking the Pals couldn’t even get a reply to letters and calls. The Arabs confirmed to Trump the deal(understandings) which they have with BB. What is not in the article is that it goes back many years at least to Cast lead and the Qatar gas deals for offshore Gaza. I wrote here all through the faux Arab springs and the assembly of GCC jihadi mercenaries in Syria, BB prisoner releases, etc. Nothing has changed other than it has become more public now. Again, these understandings once more explain “strange events” which always follow BB. Trumps change is 100% orchestrated by BB informing him that moving the embassy and encouraging settlement outside the blocks would damage his deals with the Sunni bloc. Of course Trump would go along with a covert program to a “peace deal” and play along with the usual BB MO of putting it at the feet of the foreigners.

    My view for this MO is that the leadership of the Sunni block and BB already have the deal fleshed out but the opposition on the street in Israel and the Sunni nations is too great to do in one overt deal, especially the Arabs,hence they move slowly in small informal steps on the ground and in the minds of the masses. I think that BB has a better deal with the Arab leadership than he expects from the Pals. In my view, the Sunni Arab block cooperated with Israel in the purging of Iranian influence in Gaza since the Cast Lead op whose only accomplishment was that purge, Qatar brokered the cease fire. My speculative model has a consistent logical explanation of all the relevant events for years and is stated clearly in this article. Conclusion: forget about the foreigners, all the answers are in Israel primarily with BB. Lieberman is also now on board showing that he is also OK with the understandings.

  3. …Trump is deliberating bringing in Arab states and embracing the “outside-in” approach to peacemaking that has been endorsed by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu…

    …Kushner has also become friendly with Israel’s envoy to the US Ron Dermer…

    Netanyahu, for his part, has said before that Arab cooperation could help make progress on the Palestinian issue…..

    Israel has grown closer with many of its Sunni Arab neighbors that also fear the possibility of an empowered Iran….

    President Trump ,,…….are developing a strategy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that would enlist Arab nations like Saudi Arabia and Egypt to break years of deadlock.

    The emerging approach mirrors the thinking of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel….

    They make it all sound new but I noticed it years ago when they were assembling jihadis in Syria. I realized then that all the realignments were related to the overall GCC Iran war and saw then that it went back at least to Cast Lead

    first regional conference in 1991 at which Arab leaders sat down with Israel’s prime minister. President George W. Bush invited Arab leaders to a summit meeting with Israel in Annapolis, Md., in 2007. And President Barack Obama’s first special envoy, George Mitchell, spent months in 2009 trying to enlist Arab partners in a joint effort.

    about the time of Cast Lead

    Netanyahu expressed a desire to resuscitate the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative, proposed by the Saudis, that promised Israel diplomatic recognition from Arab countries in exchange for a deal that results in the establishment of a Palestinian state. That proposal, however, calls for an Israeli withdrawal from the Golan Heights and the return of Palestinians refuges to Israel — points of contention for the Israeli premier.

    I believe that the Arabs will support BB on the Golan either directly or indirectly by supporting a buffer zone at the border for “refugees”. Same wrt returnees.

    Rather than following the external drama its more accurate to see that BB has and had understandings with the Sunni block which GOVERN all his other decision making and MO.

  4. T. Belman. Bibi has long favoured seeking peace through the Arab states i.e., the outside-in approach. Since they want the maximum Israel withdrawal, it is safe to conclude that Bibi is indeed willing to trade land for peace. He is focused on ending the diplomatic war against Israel and is willing to give up a lot of land to achieve it. Too bad.

    What’s in it for Israel? Arabs don’t need us or really give a shit about the Palis…. BB and Lieberman will probably receive hundreds of millions under the table, but how will they sell it? Abbas don’t want peace Hamas and Fatah don’t want peace what’s in it for them? Trump I understand but the rest???? Iran remains with or without treaty a risk not too distant t future Assad still enemy Iran and Hezbollah still enemy Iraq still enemy.. Everybody here know that agreements don’t amt to much anywhere but especially not here in ME…. Things can change for the worse on a dime we all know that so I ask again what’s in it for us as opposed to current status quo?

  5. @ bernard ross:

    Sounds like derivative of Saudi Peace Plan Not convinced the GCC will be much help to Trump fighting ISIS… that they still finance and support to some degree but none of them are worth diddly as a fighting formation. They have survived getting others to fight for them. Iraq with Iranian and American help can’t take Mosul and Taliban has regained most of what they lost in Afghanistan. Will Trump want to commit thousands of Troops back into the ME? Not sure he would and if he doesn’t ISIS will prevail.

  6. Qatar’s Gaza envoy hails his ties to Israel, says PA is stalling on solution to Gaza power shortageIn first talk with Israeli press, Muhammad al-Amadi details efforts to rebuild Strip, lauds ‘excellent’ relations with Jerusalem officials

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/qatari-envoy-pa-not-israel-stalling-solution-to-gaza-power-shortage/?

    Remember Qatar was there even before the Cast Lead arrangements to broker a cease fire OR according to me to cooperate with Israel to purge Hama’s and Gaza of the Iran elements

  7. I am sick of Ross crapping on forever and ever about Bibi linked to Qatar and these other Fascists of the Middle East and actually all the Arabs are. So bloody what Ross?

    Yamit for me has put his finger on it…Who of these are going to fight against ISIS, ISIS being the word for extremist Islam ideology in its many forms

    And how can this appear on an Israpundit site article without severe objections from all:

    “that even under Israeli law had been built illegally on Palestinian-owned land”

    What land is owned by Palestinians. They were and are a fraud from day one and that is a totally fraudulent statement which the BBC would be proud of.

    I as a Marxist oppose that concept totally. When the history is told truthfully there is no Palestinian owned land.

    If Trump says so he knows nothing.

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